500 Festival
Airport
Arts
Attraction
Beer
Big Ten
Biking
Broad Ripple
Colts
Concerts
Convention
Cultural District
Cultural Trail
Culture
Deals
Devour Downtown
Dining
Eleven
Fever
Food
Fountain Square
Fourth of July
Free
History
Holidays
Hotel
Indiana State Fair
Indians
Indy 500
Kids
LGBTQ
Mass Ave
Monon Trail
Monument Circle
Museum
Music
NCAA
Nightlife
Pacers
Racing
Running
Shopping
Sports
Theater
White River State Park
Zoo


Alex Sventeckis
Becca Schmiegel
Cherie Lowe
Chi Sherman
Chris Gahl
Christine Zetzl
Dawn Olsen
Jeff Robinson
Katy Mann
Kerry Cron
Lara Neal
Larry Pranger
Lisa Wallace
Marissa Renaldi
Megan Stanbrough
Mike Gillis
Morgan Snyder
Nate Swick
Sara Croft
Seth Johnson
Sierra Holmes
Victoria Davis
Guest

Dawn Olsen is a native Iowan, a Purdue graduate, and a defender of the Oxford comma. She moved to Indianapolis in 2012 and first lived in an 1860s Victorian in Herron-Morton. Dawn currently resides in historic Holy Rosary, in an apartment that is equidistant from both General American Donut Company and Rocket 88 Doughnuts. She works full-time as an editorial assistant for the Indiana General Assembly, and also works as a freelance writer. Dawn’s work can be found on Historic Indianapolis; Big City, little Indiana; and on her personal blog, where she shares creative non-fiction. When she’s not writing, Dawn is Instagramming, shopping at Homespun, or biking the Cultural Trail.
FOLLOW: @dmarieolsen

OCTOBER 18, 2019

"And So We Walked" Launches at Indiana Repertory Theatre

This fall, the Indiana Repertory Theatre launches its INclusion Series, a three-part program that celebrates diverse storytelling. First up is And So We Walked: An Artist’s Journey Along the Trail of Tears. This one-woman show, created by Cherokee artist and activist DeLanna Studi, explores the universal desire to discover one’s roots while staying cognizant of historical inaccuracies.

And So We Walked

And So We Walked is the bold, heartwarming story of Studi’s walk with her father along a 900-mile portion of the Trail of Tears. In the 1830s-1840s, thousands of Native Americans died along the Trail, which was a series of forced relocations. Among the survivors were Studi’s ancestors. Almost 200 years later, And So We Walked probes the complexities and conflicts the Cherokee Nation still faces.

 

“This is a story of trauma, loss, resilience and, most importantly, hope,” Studi said. “This isn’t just my story about my journey. It is a Cherokee story, one that transcends my own personal identity and experiences, and one that belongs to the Cherokee people, past and present.”

 

As Studi and her father retraced the steps their ancestors were forced to take in the 1830s, Studi conducted interviews and research. She also hosted workshops and storytelling circles, and even participated in traditional ceremonies. The result is a frank, moving show that intertwines past and present, history and legend. It highlights the universal desire to honor one’s roots but asks viewers to consider an often-forgotten part of American history.

 

And So We Walked

“The INclusion Series has come about to broaden our perspectives on what it means to be an American,” executive artistic director Janet Allen said. “We selected And So We Walked: An Artist’s Journey Along the Trail of Tears to give audiences personal insight into a chapter of American history that continues to resonate deeply today in the marginalizing of Native peoples.”

 

The show runs through November 15, with tickets starting at just $25. And So We Walked also contains mild language and adult situations, so the Indiana Repertory Theatre recommends patrons seventh grade and above. Tickets for And So We Walked are available online and at the box office, as are tickets for the other two INclusion productions: The Watsons Go To Birmingham – 1963 and The Paper Dreams of Harry Chin.

Visior Guide Request

Plan Your Getaway

BOOK A HOTEL
 TO 
BOOK A HOTEL
 TO